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Thread: What is reloading's future

  1. #1
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    What is reloading's future

    So been quite a while since components have been ''reasonably''priced, primers are still off the chart in value, projos, well pending who and what you want to shoot, can be pricey, deals are out there, but one must pay close attention to the extras they add on, shipping ect.

    noticed 9mm is coming down to where at present prices one could buy cheaper than reload, (calculating in the new prices on components that is)

    hard to say whats gonna happen, no clear indication of price reduction, increase in supply, hmmm, what to do, what to do.

    sure will kill a cottage industry if reloading for the common shooter, not competition folks, goes south,
    happy new year, be surprised if any new gun laws, rights fights ect. benefit the 2A crowd much

    Rj

  2. #2
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    You can still save money reloading certain calibers/gauges. 28 Gauge and .410 bore come to mind.

    Plus, I bought it cheap and stacked it deep on components so I've probably got enough to hold me for the rest of my life. Not sure about the future of prices, though. Primers can now be found for $80/1,000, blasting bullets for .223 for $100/1,000 and powder is approaching $200/8 lbs so I'm optimistic.

  3. #3
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    yeah, i stocked real deep also, but plan on shooting a whole lot more than have over last decade, am always on lookout for reloading component deals, to replace what i have, one never knows, don't reload shotgun, but have everything to do so on stand by, so.......have a gaggle of game and self defense ammo for most gauges, and or calibers, so....

    gonna be a interesting few years to see what pans out, and if they attempt to control reloading, pretty sure they'll figure out its something they haven't visited in earnest yet
    Rj

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    I remember people telling me California did a thing a long, long time ago about reloading. IIRC, it was the early 1970s, the gun stores would record who bought powder and how much they bought. No restrictions, just recording who bought what. Evidently that came to a halt some time later, don't know when.

  5. #5
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    yeah, changes are coming for sure, i'm stocked, but now that i'm off and probably or hopefully gonna shoot more, gonna have to work on the ammo side, i have a lot already reloaded and new, but again pending replacement of old sock, as components are not coming down in price as expected.
    so factory produced ammo is the avenue for most, i have managed to grab some 9mm cases for almost the price of what i can reload for, and shotgun ammo, have a gaggle, but again, not being a hunter what i have should last, and i do have the goods for reloading that ammo also.

    Was out at a range the other day, and its clear, few reload, the amount of brass on site was unreal, the commons tuff, but the rifle brass on the odd stuff was rare for sure, but 223 brass was pretty available. appears the bulk of shooters buy ammo, shoot it, and most do not even make an effort to clean up, especially the shot gunners, easy to bring a magnet and police your empties for sure.
    oh well
    may the hump day be gracious to you and yours
    Rj

  6. #6
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    As a recent participant in reloading, I don' think I save any money on the calibers I am reloading (45-70, 223, 308, 7.5x55, 6.5cm, 357, 460, 500sw, ) except a few "odd" ones. But, my main goal for stockpiling stuff now is to ensure that when they day comes and we all are subject to California style ammo restrictions (background checks, limits, etc) I have enough stuff sitting around it won't affect me. Also, since I am a bit of a data / process junkie I enjoy the process of messing around with diff projectiles, powders, and variations.

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    I'd bet any amount of money you're saving money on .45-70, .460 and 500S&W

    The rest, not so much at current prices.

    OTOH, I'm reloading .223 for 11 a round as I bought the components a long time ago.

    And yes, stockpiling against an uncertain future is definitely a smart thing IMO.

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    And 7.5x55. Same projectiles and powder as .308. As 7.5x55 is creeping up on over $2 a round......
    the 45-70 is def saving money as I got all the projectiles, powder, primers, and brass really cheap as a package deal when I bought a Sharps long range.

  9. #9
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    yeah, i get the value placed on reloads, but replacement of old stock, if needed will change the future of reloading, i don't reload for precision, not any more, just function and point of aim, my days of 800 plus yd shots is over, still have a few long gun gats, and fondle on occassion to remember yesteryear, probably leave it at that and not disappoint myself by failing to be as good as i was. lol. i'm just old not dead.
    good luck with the reloading and finding components for replacement.
    Rj

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